The unsubtly Bold Life - with Photographer Eric Richards * TonboMai

The unsubtly Bold Life – with Photographer Eric Richards

Posted By tonbomai on Jun 22, 2014


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Even looking at Photographer Eric Richards most subtle photographs- there is a strength pulling the viewer inward, evoking an emotion…each photograph is purposeful and deliberate while still maintaining unposed, spontaneous beauty.

His love for music is evident, as in the bold strength of each of his photographs. You don’t just see Eric’s photographs , you hear them…you feel them…and eventually, you are thrown into that moment.

Eric Richards was born and raised in the beautiful state of Colorado. During his younger years, he developed a keen interest in music—being the beginning of his creative endeavors. Powerful music intrigued him and he continued to grow in the art of film scoring and individual music composition. It wasn’t until recently that he witnessed the beautiful marriage between visual and audio art. He had already submerged himself in the audio side with music and he wanted to explore what the visual side was like. Eric is now going to college at the Colorado Film School in Aurora, Colorado and finished a course from Berklee Online for Film Scoring. While attending the Colorado Film School, he felt himself growing as a photographer with a much higher passion than a ‘spontaneous amateur’ might expect.

 

1. What attracted you to photography?

The journey to admiring photography has been quite intimate. I initially had no interest in photography and I mainly focused on my musical passions. As time yielded itself, the art of photography came to me as a whisper. My full attention and interest had not yet submerged me but it started to grow within me. In my earlier days, taking a picture was nothing more than a mere task. I believe my interest came from seeing what photography can do.
Other people may see taking a picture as, well, just taking a picture—as I did. However, many people don’t know what power they posses having a camera. A camera can expose the hidden magic within our known natural world. I started to see this whilst photographing random moments. In each moment was a new secret, a new existence. Of course, in those photos, they weren’t so great because I knew nothing of photography etiquette or structure, technicality or technique—but it inspired me to learn.

Photography allows me to exploit the hidden creation in this world. We live in a broken world. I like to transform what we see in this broken world into something beautiful. Though this world does yield beauty on its own and I love capturing its natural gorgeous promises; possibly even enhancing its natural state to a level of beauty that is untamed and unreachable on its own. I want to expose Heaven on Earth. In the cracks of this broken world unravels bits of unashamed beauty that can’t possibly be from this planet.
2. How would you describe your photography style?

This is a difficult question to answer for me mainly because I am still new in the art of photography. I don’t think I have a definite “style” down or at least understand the concept of styles fully yet. To me, I just take a photo in which I think would look best for the situation. It is odd that we become immune to seeing ourselves and how we perceive the world until it is mentioned by someone else. Though, searching through my photos, I find a common theme: Boldness. I have described most of my photography theory in my previous answer but I do find myself circling back to having an aggressive picture style. Whether it may be experimental, casual portraits or landscapes, they all, for a lack of a better term, pop out at the viewer. Feels very authoritative.
3. What inspires you?

My faith –undoubtable has encouraged me and inspired me to do anything and everything I am currently involved in. Christianity plays a substantial role in my life, making every day a new day to be inspired. My desiring eye for beauty would be forfeited without the connection of my spiritual life.
4. How have you evolved in your art since starting?

In every way possible– with so much more to go! Photography is paralleled to explaining an idea or thought into words for others to understand. At first, you may not have the diverse vocabulary to elaborate your idea and merely confuse your listener. Although as you read and collect new ways of thought, you begin to align together clearer ways of describing your idea. So, in this same process, I grew the same way. We all have a piece of a majestic puzzle. Mine is different from yours and yours is different from your friend’s and so on. Like reading a book, observing other people’s photography helped me define what piece of the puzzle is naturally within me. My mental visionary may not have evolved over time but how I share my vision evolved drastically. With every new photo I take, or see, and every moment I live on this good earth, I will continue to evolve, or I guess I should say refine, in ways to expose my piece of the puzzle for others to enjoy.
5. What do you think the job of a good photograph is? What should it do?

A good photograph should call some kind of emotional reaction or display a clear message. It could either be beautiful or brutally honest. Anyone can take a picture but the job of a photograph is much deeper than a simple capture. I don’t mean the object itself has to be simple or complex; I mean in the way it is portrayed to others viewing the image. An object is just an object. A point in time is just another point on a massive timeline. Though how the photograph is captured can enhance or blunt the moment. The job for a good photograph is a difficult but honorable one.
6. Which photographers do you admire most?

I honestly don’t have a photographer I solely admire. The name always escapes my interest unless I need the name. Initially I would think that more credit should be given to those who take amazing photographs. The stories that lie behind taking the photos are always so inspiring. Yet, many do not know the messenger that provides the photo. To a degree, that is a good thing. The photographer did their job well when the photo feels like it is its own existence. Sometimes the photos are so good that it seems like there was no camera at all and you feel physically present in the photo. I admire the name be left unknown even if it were my own. There is something substantially poetic about a silent photographer.

7. What would you say to someone considering photography?

Be honest and don’t be afraid to show your work. Honesty is the best way to help you advance forward in your endeavors as a photographer. Also, don’t be too concerned about cameras, lenses and the horrors of the endless depths of equipment. They are not “must haves” to be a photographer. They are tools at your disposal. Don’t buy an outrageous nice camera if you don’t even need half of what it provides. In time, you will eventually need what those cameras and other pieces equipment can do but as for right now, enjoy the gift of simplicity. Just you and your camera whatever it may be. It is an intimate experience.

 

Find out more about Photographer Eric Richards and see his work!

https://www.flickr.com/photos/107650451@N02/

https://www.facebook.com/Joshua.Empyre

 

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All photographs on this page are the property of photographer Eric Richards. You must
have his permission to use any photograph.Please contact him through the links provided.